Decomposition and arthropod Succession on two monkeys (cercopithecus aethiopicus)

Lobna Mohammed Ahmed Gurafi, El Amin El Rayah Mohamed

Abstract


This study was carried out at the Faculty of Science, Department of Zoology. Monkeys were used as a model to mimic decomposition of a human cadaver. For this study two monkeys (freshly dead) were exposed to insects in two different sites, one site was in the sun and located on the roof of the Zoology Department, and the other was in the shade and located under a tree near the animal house of the Zoology Department. The Calliphoridae, Sarcophagidae and Muscidae (Diptera) are the primary insects associated with carrion followed by Histeridae, Cleridae and Dermestidae (Coleoptera).
There was no difference in the arthropod community collected from sun and shade sites of the two animals; but the decomposition was faster in the sunny area than in shaded one.

Keywords


Decomposition, succession, forensic entomology.

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References


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